Tingalpa Roof Inspection Report Purpose:

Provide a roof condition report to N.C.C 2016 Vol.2, AS 1562.1, AS 1562.3, SA HB 39 2015 The Installation Code for Metal Roofing and Walling and Manufacturer’s Instructions. Provide recommendations to extend longevity

Findings & Recommendations In Tingalpa Roof Inspection Report

  • Roof sheeting in general is reaching the end of its serviceable lifespan with oxidation occurring to the sheeting throughout. Fasteners are heavily corroded, and this will spread to the sheeting.
  • Widespread severe foot traffic damage across all roof areas is likely leading to ingress. Given the amount of foot traffic damage repairs would not be practical and short term at best.
  • Sheeting not turned down as per manufacturer’s installation instructions. This is isolated to this location only.
  • Dektite penetrations throughout have reached the end of their serviceable lifespan. Many of these are blocking water flow of sheet pans and affecting the anti-capillary of the sheet lap. I also note the widespread use of Wetseal and silicone in fact reduces lifespan further as it traps moisture from condensation leading to corrosion. These repairs are temporary at best. An appropriate installation of a Dektite shown below.
  • AC unit multiple pipe penetrations are problematic and require ongoing maintenance. We recommend the use of the PVC gooseneck method with AC unit instals to eliminate potential ingress and maintenance. Again, attempts at repair are temporary at best. Correct install of an AC unit gooseneck shown below.
  • Corrosion from other sources, with AC units, their supports and copper saturated water run-off to affect the roof sheeting and components if not remedied.
  • Whirlybird installation failures throughout all roof areas. The bases of the Whirlybirds have reached the end of their serviceable lifespan. Some of these bases are for skylights and not appropriate for whirlybird installation. Flashing coverage is the major issue with Whirlybirds as the supplied bases do not give the required 150mm minimum roof coverage. Widespread attempts at repairs are temporary at best.
  • Fibreglass installation with repairs likely from ingress occurring. Potentially no infill strip has been installed to the top of the sheeting as per manufacturer’s installation instructions or failure of this product has occurred as it reaches the end of its serviceable lifespan.
  • Box gutter and surrounding soaker flashings reaching the end of their serviceable lifespan. Box gutter has no allowance for overflow should an outlet become blocked. Installing tray flashings to the apex instead of soakers will give longevity.
  • Skylights installations throughout all roof areas reaching the end of their serviceable lifespan.
  • Apron flashings with no allowance for thermal movement are failing throughout all roof areas.
  • Flashings fixed to the roof are not to be fastened to other building materials. Pressure flashings will remedy this. I also note the fatigued concrete walls could be contributing to the ingress with failure of the expansion joints of the tilt up panels and porous concrete.
  • Box gutter reaching the end of its serviceable lifespan, with repairs to the flashing connections.
  • Box gutter reaching the end of its serviceable lifespan, with repairs to the flashing connections. No allowance for overflow if an outlet were to become blocked. I also note there is a Pittsburg join in the base of the box gutter due to the size of the gutter, it would be prudent to have this installed to the side of the gutter where it is not under constant potential for ingress. Depth is rather excessive and perhaps during replacement this can be reduced to remove the need for the Pittsburgh connection.
  • Box gutter and surrounding soaker flashings reaching the end of their serviceable lifespan. Box gutter has no allowance for overflow should an outlet become blocked. Installing tray flashings to the apex instead of soakers will give longevity.
  • Eaves guttering throughout has reached the end of its serviceable lifespan. Corrosion and failures occurring in several areas.
  • Box gutter with ponding corrosion and likely ingress issues from failed connections as it reaches the end of its serviceable lifespan.
  • Box gutter with ponding corrosion and likely ingress issues from failed connections as it reaches the end of its serviceable lifespan.
  • Severely fatigued fibreglass sheeting should have been replaced prior to the solar install occurring. Ingress likely in this area.
  • Large penetrations throughout all roof areas with insufficient flashing coverage and soaker trays and flashing connections reaching the end of their serviceable lifespan.
  • Box gutter with ponding corrosion and likely ingress issues from failed connections as it reaches the end of its serviceable lifespan.
  • Box gutter reaching the end of its serviceable lifespan, with repairs to the flashing connections. No allowance for overflow if an outlet were to become blocked. I also note there is a Pittsburg join in the base of the box gutter due to the size of the gutter, it would be prudent to have this installed to the side of the gutter where it is not under constant potential for ingress.
  • Depth is rather excessive and perhaps during replacement this can be reduced to remove the need for the Pittsburgh connection.
  • Box gutter with ponding corrosion and likely ingress issues from failed connections as it reaches the end of its serviceable lifespan. I also note this box gutter has side discharge which is non-complaint to SA HB 39 refer 5.3.3(b).
  • Several compliances issues with the lower roof here. Insufficient flashing coverage of apron flashings and penetration flashings. Multiple pipe penetrations.
  • Box gutter ponding. Exposed copper piping. No allowance for thermal movement with
    all flashings.
  • Box gutter with ponding corrosion and likely ingress issues from failed connections as it reaches the end of its serviceable lifespan.
  • Flashings are heavily reliant on silicone which has no longevity. This area can easily be flashed out to give longevity and remove potential ingress.
  • Rainheads throughout the complex are inadequate. Not sealed to the box gutter. No allowance for overflow. Not sized to suit the gutter shape.

Inspection Site Gallery

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Conclusion

In general, the roof and its components have reached the end of its serviceable lifespan, combined with compliance issues throughout the roof is likely causing ingress in several locations.

Several attempts at repairs have occurred throughout the roof with failures likely to still be occurring with ingress throughout.

The widespread use of Wetseal and silicone with repairs have largely been inadequate and likely caused further damage to the roof. These types of repairs are temporary at best.

The most feasible option here is full replacement of the roof and all its components.

Building Code References In Tingalpa Roof Inspection Report

B6.5.1 Surface Damage

Badly damaged panels should be replaced and the manufacturer consulted for the best way to remove and replace the panels. Minor damage can often be repaired in situ.

B 6.5.2 Sheet Damage

A dent, split or puncture in the external skin should not be left untreated as it will accelerate corrosion and, in some insulated products, absorb water into the insulation core. On a roof, it is sometimes possible to repair by over-skinning with a matching profiled skin. All edges are to be sealed to prevent moisture getting between the two skins. On a wall, it is not usually possible to over-skin and in this instance replacement of panel is generally the preferred option. The panel manufacturer should be consulted as to the preferred option.

8.6.1 Collar Flashings

Where any part of the roof surface is penetrated by any pipe, pole, duct, flue, shaft, cable or tank support, the penetration is to be flashed to prevent the entry of rainwater, and to permit the roof surface and penetrating object to expand and contract without detrimental effect to any part of the roof. In addition, particular attention is to be paid to the following:

Pondage Colar flashing to permit the total drainage of the area above the penetration

The anti-capillary feature shall meet the following requirements:

(i) The anti-capillary feature shall be positioned on the overlap lip side of the roofing
side lap.
(ii) The anti-capillary feature shall be between the mating surfaces of the lapping ribs.
(iii) The anti-capillary feature shall provide a minimum separation of 1 mm.
(iv) The anti-capillary feature shall not be compromised by installation practices such as
over-tightening of crest fasteners .

If any one parameter (i) to (iv) above is not met, the profile shall be deemed as not having
an anti-capillary feature.

4.2.1.11

Plastic roof sheeting is not easily reshaped after manufacture and will require special weather seals to be provided at all flashing and capping points. Typically a foam closure strip matching the profile of the plastic sheeting should be provided to seal the corrugations or pans of the profile under each flashing. The form closure should be bonded to the pans or valleys of the plastic sheeting with a flexible waterproof sealant and should be continuous over the entire width of the plastic sheeting. Ideally it should be fitted at least 10mm behind the turn down of the flashing.

5.3.1 Overflow provision and size

To protect buildings from a total or partial blockage of outlets, downpipes or stormwater drains, it is essential that box gutters discharge all roof water clear of the building via overflows. To ensure that adequate overflow provisions are made and any surcharge is accommodated, the overflow of any rain head is to be not less than 25mm below the sole of the gutter discharging to the rain head. Box gutter sumps are to be fitted with overflow ducts, overflow channels or high capacity overflow devices.

8.1.3 Expansion Provision

Roof flashings and cappings are to be installed to permit longitudinal expansion and contraction without detrimental effect to the flashing themselves and other roof components, structures and covers.

Roof flashings and cappings fastened to metallic roof covering materials are not to be fastened to other building materials with other than sliding cleats or fixings.

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